For companies whose business depends on preserving foods, floral products, scientific research and more, ever-present humidity challenges in cold storage must be managed to ensure quality control, as well as product and human safety.

But what is humidity? What causes humidity fluctuations within cold storage? What are the negatives of too much humidity? And how can it be managed?

Humidity 101

Humidity is the concentration of water vapor in the air. In any environment, humidity is always present.

For cold storage or cold rooms where the temperature is typically much lower than the outer environment, the effects of humidity can escalate. When a door is opened or a panel seal is faulty, warmer air particles from the surrounding area are drawn inside, where the moisture is condensed and increases the humidity within the controlled environment.

High humidity forces cold storage refrigeration to work harder to treat it. Sometimes, it can keep up – but at the cost of ballooning energy usage and more.

However, there are also times when humidity is simply too great. Left untreated, this added moisture promotes the growth of mold and mildew, producing toxic spores that are hazardous to human health, which is particularly concerning when a walk-in houses food or valuable research that may get contaminated by the spores.

When high humidity levels are present in cold storage installations, especially during the warmer months, interruptions in production processes can occur that may result in delays, economic losses, increased energy costs and more.

Gauging Humidity and Its Effects

While it may be difficult to know how much humidity is present inside your cold storage set-up, there are indicators—some of which can be hazardous to both employees and equipment and adverse for business—that are easy to spot.

These include:
– Frost on glass doors that impedes product visibility and attractiveness to your consumers
– Ice deposits that materialize on fixtures, cold surfaces, walls and ceilings, which can fall and cause injury to goods, equipment and staff
– Ice buildup on evaporator coils that hinders cold storage efficiency
– Water that accumulates and forms puddles that may present slip and skid hazards for employees, forklifts and other machinery
– Mist that forms in the air that obstructs walk-in visibility
– Stored goods that become noticeably wet, resulting in product damage, waste and negative customer relations

KPS Global: Empowering You to Meet Humidity Challenges in Cold Storage Head On

At KPS Global, we’re committed to helping you address the challenges presented by humidity in cold storage by helping you stop in their tracks before they begin.

As the leading manufacturer of walk-in coolers and freezers, KPSG is ready to help you tackle cold storage needs across a variety of industries, from retail and foodservice to specialty applications, equipment enclosures, scientific applications, warehouses and more.

If you’re ready to find out how KPSG can help address the unique challenges you face in cold storage, contact us today at https://kpsglobal.com/contact/contact-form/.